Building a Better Border Means Relating to Communities

President Obama recently stood in front of the nation and made a historic, and much anticipated, announcement on immigration policy. His executive action will spare millions of mothers, fathers, workers and students from the threat of deportation, and was the result of the work of a mobilized and passionate immigrant rights movement.


Narrative & Messaging & Ferguson

This blog post was submitted by Cleo Stern, Fall 2014 Home Opportunity Intern.

We know that narrative and messaging are powerful. Narratives tell us a story that frames specific values and messages within a broader movement. These stories and messages are persuasive and instill us with common values, beliefs, and ideas.


Hollaback & Harassment

Unless you’ve been on a TV/Internet fast for the past week, you’ve probably heard about the Hollaback video. And the inevitable backlash, from all sides. 

Just in case you have recently returned from a trip to the Himalayas, or my grandmother’s house (seriously, no wifi and a 3G dead zone?), Hollaback, an anti-street harassment group, recently released a video:


Why Now is the Time to Tackle Poverty

in

Window of Opportunity

Every couple of generations, the stars align to create the potential for monumental, transformative social change. It turns out we're in just such a moment right now when it comes to tackling poverty in the United States.

I don't blame you for being skeptical. Economic inequality is growing, big corporations are consolidating their political power, and our federal government is mired in partisan gridlock. So why am I still smiling?


From Fear to Action: Celebrating the Tree that Grew from Creative Change

in

 

What happens when artists and activists unite to battle climate change?

The Climate Ribbon at the People's Climate March

From the civil rights movement to protecting the environment, we’ve seen how artists and cultural visionaries are among our nation’s greatest social justice leaders, not merely supporters of causes or movements. The giant Tree of Life, a symbolic centerpiece for the largest climate-related mobilization in U.S. history, grew from a seed of an idea planted in the mountains of Utah this summer.

The tree’s growth highlights how the powerful combination of arts, culture, and social justice organizing generates a new way of thinking about shared challenges and the impacts of injustice—forging a vision for change that goes beyond traditional issue campaigns.


Julian Castro Must Uphold Fair Housing

in

Last week, the U.S. Senate overwhelmingly confirmed San Antonio Mayor Julián Castro to lead the Department of Housing and Urban Development. One of Castro’s first official acts as HUD Secretary should be to concretize the Department’s duty to promote fair housing throughout its programs and activities.


What We Say and What We Do

How We Communicate on Immigration Greatly Influences Our Course of Action 


Central American children (above) seek solace in the U.S.

By Melissa Moore and Julie Fisher-Rowe

Americans of all stripes take pride in our country’s reputation as a place of opportunity, and time and again migrants to the US prove crucial to our country’s economy, social fabric, and future potential. But the values we hold dear and our national rhetoric on immigration have sharply diverged—with dangerous implications for vulnerable children arriving at the border who need real solutions now more than ever.


The Voice & Vision of Maya Angelou

Musings from members of our community about the impact of Dr. Maya Angelou on their lives, dreams, and creativity.

A Young Girl, Grabbing Life by the Lapels, by Eva-Marie Malone

It feels like a contradiction to mourn the passing of Dr. Angelou, because unlike many other well-known people who are gone, her life doesn’t seem incomplete. Often, the first response to the loss of someone famous is to imagine “what might have been” or what else they might have accomplished. Everything about Dr. Angelou’s life and writing felt complete.  Although this transition feels like a personal loss to many of us, her impact continues to resonate and breathe for all of us. 


From Angie Zapata to Laverne Cox

Sitting in a cab on my way to the airport, after facilitating a full-day communications workshop in Mississippi, I flipped through a magazine mindlessly. Suddenly an advertising insert from a department store caught my eye. It was Barneys' campaign featuring exclusively transgender models, Brothers, Sisters, Sons & Daughters. My thoughts immediately flashed back to 2009 when I was working at GLAAD and was focused on increasing Spanish language media coverage on Angie Zapata’s story. Angie was an 18-year-old from Colorado who was beaten to death with a fire extinguisher after her date found out she had been assigned a male identity at birth. The case drew national attention as one of the first in which a hate crime law was applied in a murder trial where the victim was transgender.


Why the Sterlings Matter

Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling doubled down on bigotry this week, disparaging NBA icon Magic Johnson for his HIV positive status, and saying that Johnson and other African-American entrepreneurs have done little to assist the black community. Sterling’s latest rantings made clear the depth of his personal prejudices, and that his racist remarks on a surreptitiously recorded telephone call were no anomaly.


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