Making The Invisible Visible

Photo courtesy of Julio Salgado 

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“The immigrant youth movement is on point. There’s a commitment for LGBT folks to be represented at every level of our movement,” says Project Coordinator of the Queer Undocumented Immigrant Project (QUIP), a project of the United We Dream Network based in California, Jorge Gutierrez. He speaks of creating a platform where LGBT families are included within the larger immigration policy reform discourse and the need to uplift the stories of undocumented LGBT immigrants in addition to same sex couples where one is a citizen and other is not (also known as bi-national couples) which have received some mainstream media attention.

Redrawing the image of the LGBT community in the American mind.


Photo courtesy of Zap2It

 On November 6, 2012 the American people reached new historic milestones. Not only did we re-elect the first African-American president, we also elected the first openly gay indivudal to the U.S. Senate, Tammy Baldwin (D-WI). We also elected four new openly gay individuals to the U.S. House of Representatives, bringing their total to 6, a record for that chamber of Congress. Currently, there are more than 530 openly gay elected officials in the U.S, according to the Victory Fund.  

South Carolina Decision Underlines Need for Immigration Reform

This article was originally posted at The State 

By Rev. Sandy Jones

The U.S. District Court’s order blocking key provisions of South Carolina’s extreme anti-immigrant law is a step toward what the election confirmed is America’s real aspiration and need: comprehensive federal immigration reform.

Creative Change: Grow with the Flow!


This article was originally published by ARTSblog. Please visit ARTSblog's Blog Salon, a series of posts by guest bloggers. 

In the arts & social justice world, a plan for expanding impact is more than good business, it’s our roadmap for changing the world.

Infrastructure and funding for arts-for-change projects may be nascent, but as Jeff Chang and Brian Komar remind us in Culture Before Politics, creativity is the “most renewable, sustainable, and boundless of resources” with which we can capture the American imagination and plant seeds of social transformation.

An Opportunity Century? Election 2012, Social Justice, and America

As the election results sink in, partisans are busy debating what 2012 voting patterns mean for Republican and Democratic prospects in the next election cycle. But what lessons do this year’s results hold for those of us who are committed to expanding opportunity and protecting human rights in ways that transcend party and outlast individual elections or candidates? The lessons are plenty, including some that defy the conventional wisdom.

ProPublica Series: Living Apart: How the Government Betrayed a Landmark Civil Rights Law

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By Nikole Hannah-Jones

The original article can be found here.

A few months after Congress passed a landmark law directing the federal government to dismantle segregation in the nation's housing, President Nixon's housing chief began plotting a stealth campaign.

The plan, George Romney wrote in a confidential memo to aides, was to use his power as secretary of Housing and Urban Development to remake America's housing patterns, which he described as a "high-income white noose" around the black inner city.

Lost Opportunity



What must Brigitte Walker think about the presidential candidates? Ms. Walker is an Iraq War veteran, a former staff sergeant who served our country for 21 years until a spinal injury from a mortar attack forced her to leave the military. She comes from a proud family of veterans and service members, including a daughter in the army whose upcoming deployment, her third, will be to Afghanistan.

Low Down Payments Are Not Always High Risk


By Nikitra Bailey

This article was originally published by Politico 

Just as we are beginning to see signs of recovery in housing, federal regulators are considering a policy that could threaten economic progress and financial opportunities for middle-class families. This policy would require a 10 percent or other minimum down payment on home loans before the federal government will label them “safe” as “qualified residential mortgages.”

It's Time To Debate Home Opportunity


For months I’ve been part of a chorus of voices calling on the presidential candidates to talk about home opportunity. Their virtual silence on addressing foreclosures, restoring devastated communities, ensuring fair housing and lending, and resurrecting the American Dream has been both outrageous and baffling. Outrageous, because abuse by banks and inadequate consumer protections have cost millions of Americans their homes and visited untold suffering. Baffling, given the toll that the crisis continues to take on voters in battleground states like Nevada, Florida, and Ohio.

A Meeting at the White House on Homeownership


Last week I attended a meeting at the White House with Obama administration officials on the housing and homeownership crisis. I joined 150 faith, civil rights, consumer protection, and community leaders from around the country to express the urgency of the crisis, share our stories, and promote practical solutions.

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