National Farmworker Awareness Week

The last seven days of March are National Farmworker Awareness Week. Since 1999, Student Action with Farmworkers has coordinated this week of action to “raise awareness about farmworker issues, honor their everyday contributions, and gain more allies to help advocate for better living and working conditions in the fields.” Farm work exposes workers to significant occupational hazards and has few federal labor protections such as overtime pay or unemployment insurance. Talk about farmworker rights citing the values of economic opportunity, equity, and community.

March Madness

The March Madness college basketball tournaments begin this week. Both the men’s and women’s tournaments continue through the end of March, culminating with the NCAA Women’s and Men’s National Championship games. In recent years, the inequitable facilities and promotion of the two tournaments have drawn criticism. Both men and women athletes have also benefited in recent years from the reversal of prohibitions on financial compensation, with collegiate athletes now able to sign name, image, and likeness endorsements (NIL). Cite the values of voice and equity when talking in support of paying student-athletes.

State of Indian Nations

Each year, the president of the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) presents the State of Indian Nations around the same time as the U.S. president’s State of the Union. To facilitate direct engagement, a member of Congress is also invited each year to deliver a congressional response.

Super Bowl

Today is Super Bowl Sunday. While the big game is best known for entertaining commercials and snack spreads, the media event surrounding it has also created opportunities for cultural strategies, from Beyoncé’s iconic halftime show to activism for NFL teams to drop offensive and disparaging Native American mascots. Cite the values of voice and equity.

Kwanzaa

As you prepare for the holiday season, help your audiences get ready for effective and meaningful family conversations about racial justice and economic opportunity. Refer to values of equity, voice, and community.

Hanukkah

As you prepare for the holiday season, help your audiences get ready for effective and meaningful family conversations about racial justice and economic opportunity. Refer to values of equity, voice, and community.

Christmas

As you prepare for the holiday season, help your audiences get ready for effective and meaningful family conversations about racial justice and economic opportunity. Refer to values of equity, voice, and community.

Thirteenth Amendment Approved

On December 18, 1865, the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution was officially approved. The amendment abolished slavery and involuntary servitude, except as punishment for a crime. This exception is often discussed in today’s discussions about criminal justice reform (including Ava DuVernay’s documentary, “13th”). Use this anniversary to talk about the continued need for racial justice in the United States, especially in our criminal justice system. Cite the values of equity and safety.

Bill of Rights Day

President Franklin D. Roosevelt designated Dec. 15 as Bill of Rights Day to commemorate the first ten amendments becoming a part of the U.S. Constitution. A few years later, Roosevelt called for a Second Bill of Rights to expand economic opporunity and prosperity. In telling your story, we recommend leading with the values of equity and community.

The National Hunger March reached Washington D.C.

On this day in 1931, The National Hunger March reached Washington D.C. The marchers demanded “unemployment insurance, the seven-hour workday with no cut in pay; a federal work program paying union wages; an end to racial discrimination and deportations of immigrant workers; support for the demands of the veterans and poor farmers; and that all funds being built up for making war be used instead to help the unemployed.” Throughout its history, the United States has risen to the challenge of poverty and hunger. Today, we continue to work to eradicate these issues. In telling your story, we recommend referring to the values of economic opportunity, community, and equity.

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